Don't forget Anton Refregier's murals in San Francisco

 
LA Times | Travel
 

Golden thoughts of San Francisco Regarding Chris Reynolds' \"San Francisco Treasure Hunt\" [March 8]. I'm surprised he didn't include the Anton Refregier murals in what used to be the Rincon Annex Post Office, now a redeveloped complex. The building is open to the public. There is a nice set o...

By From The Los Angeles Times // 03.11.09
 

Golden thoughts of San Francisco

Regarding Chris Reynolds' "San Francisco Treasure Hunt" [March 8]. I'm surprised he didn't include the Anton Refregier murals in what used to be the Rincon Annex Post Office, now a redeveloped complex. The building is open to the public. There is a nice set of pictures at www.flickr.com/photos/sftrajan/2054921895/. Technically, they're not from the Depression, as Refregier began them in 1940, but they're a great set of California history panels -- inspiring, but warts and all, including the not-so-pretty labor troubles. I haven't seen them since the building was renovated, but the pictures show that they're well-preserved.

-- Robert Helfman, Los Angeles

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Chris Reynolds' "San Francisco Treasure Hunt" really hit home. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, I enlisted in the WAVES. After boot camp, I ended up in the Federal Building in San Francisco. As a member of the Navy chorus, I sang at important signings. And on V-J Day, I watched humanity pour into the streets to celebrate. Drinks at the Top of the Mark were not $7 for a beer! Thanks for the refresher.

--Priscilla Skipper Wood, Riverside

'Anytime dining': matter of choice

Regarding Catharine Hamm's "Take Your Seat" ["On the Spot," March 8]. Based on my experience with traditional cruise-ship dining (early or late seating), if you go in person to the maitre d' and ask to be seated at the time of your choice, he will undoubtedly find a table for you. I have done this and always been successful. Also, you rarely have to remain at a table with unsuitable table mates. Just ask the maitre d' to move you to a different table. He is usually understanding. We did this on our recent trip and moved to a table where we had good conversation for the rest of our cruise.

-- Barbara Walker, Encinitas

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A word of warning to people who choose the "anytime dining" option. I've spent 150 days at sea in the last four to five years, so I've acquired some experience. Sadly, "anytime dining" is often a farce, because the wait for a table when you show up "anytime" can be 90 minutes or more.

I'm not sure whether the explanation is smaller ships, larger dining areas or better planning, but Azamara and Silversea pull off "anytime dining" with style. Waits are short; staffs are gracious; the experience is memorable. I haven't seen this level of efficiency on mega-ships.

-- Jay Gordon, Willits, Calif.

Call it a sparkling cruise souvenir

My husband and I are avid cruisers and the sale of real or faux gems onboard is just not an issue. In response to Ted and Mia Wu [Letters, March 8], if that was their only complaint, I wish them many more wonderful sea days. If jewelry is not their thing, they should ignore the advertisements provided by the cruise line, as I do. But there are those who love a piece of jewelry as a memento of a special cruise.

-- Patricia Bollman, Cerritos